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Is there a way to input "other tax" on form 1040?

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Is there a way for me to put "other tax" on form 1040 in a similar way as I put "other income" on the form? The use use case is that I need to transfer a tax from dual-status statement form 1040-nr schedule NEC to form 1040. Thanks.
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#2
Taxaway  
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Depending on your software, you have a tax payment worksheet, and within "additional other taxes", an unassigned line to enter a literal. "From Form 1040NR" if your 1040 is the dual status return. Though you should be transferring the total 1040NR tax, maybe you meant that?
 

#3
CathysTaxes  
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What software are you using?
Cathy
CathysTaxes
 

#4
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CathysTaxes wrote:What software are you using?


It is Intuit's Proconnect Tax Online.

Let me take this opportunity to change the situation and ask another question:

I have a single nonresident to resident dual status client, he has no income at all during his nonresident period, so his dual status return is the same as a resident return except he cannot take standard deduction which I can force it on the software. I can also add text "Dual-Status Return" on top of the form 1040, and can attached a "Dual-Status Statement", in this simple case, can I e-file it? Does the IRS record it in its transcript any differently if I file on paper or file electronically?

The IRS instruction for dual status says "mail the return", does it prevent me from filing electronically?
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#5
ATSMAN  
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Look like you have accomplished what you wanted except for the e-file. Have you tried that in Proconnect? Does it say it can't be e-filed?
 

#6
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ATSMAN wrote:Look like you have accomplished what you wanted except for the e-file. Have you tried that in Proconnect? Does it say it can't be e-filed?


It can be e-filed technically. I am wondering if it has any bad consequences. Am I allowed to E-file, and if not, why? Thanks.
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#7
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Taxaway wrote:Depending on your software, you have a tax payment worksheet, and within "additional other taxes", an unassigned line to enter a literal. "From Form 1040NR" if your 1040 is the dual status return. Though you should be transferring the total 1040NR tax, maybe you meant that?


I am not sure about transferring the total 1040NR tax. I thought I should add all the income (and withholding) instead of the taxes. For example, if I had 40K during the nonresident period, and 60K during the resident period, I should combine the income and then compute the tax, instead of computer the tax on 40K and 60K separately and combine the tax.

The tax on schedule NEC of form 1040-NR is different. It is not part of the taxable income, and its tax is computed separately.
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#8
Taxaway  
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It's been years since I've had to do one, but remember this way: with the 1040NR as the dual status statement, prepare this first with the appropriate income and deductions (since you have to itemize and limited anyway). You arrive at a tax liability. Full stop.

Now on the dual status 1040 return being the year-end status, also with appropriate period of income/itemized deductions, arrive at that tax liability. Add the 1040NR tax and withholding to the main return. Now you have the grand total.
 

#9
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Taxaway wrote:Now on the dual status 1040 return being the year-end status, also with appropriate period of income/itemized deductions, arrive at that tax liability. Add the 1040NR tax and withholding to the main return. Now you have the grand total.

I am fairly sure this is not the way to do it, because if you only use the income in second year-end status, it will be taxed at the lowest rate. You add the income together.
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#10
Taxaway  
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puravidatpt wrote:I am fairly sure this is not the way to do it, because if you only use the income in second year-end status, it will be taxed at the lowest rate. You add the income together.


So you're only "fairly sure?" The IRS publication otherwise seemed very sure.
 

#11
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I am actually working on dual status return and am researching for an answer.

The taxpayer in my case has invested in an LLC and received a K-1 while he is a nonresident. Then he received his green card during the year. That makes him a dual status return filer.

The K-1 income is connected to the US source in both periods. Should I put it on 1040 (not allocate to 1040NR) to arrive at the progressive rate that the taxpayer is entitled to?

My understanding is that income connected to the US Source will be taxed at the progressive rate as a US person.

Please help.
 

#12
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yyy10016 wrote:The K-1 income is connected to the US source in both periods. Should I put it on 1040 (not allocate to 1040NR) to arrive at the progressive rate that the taxpayer is entitled to?


If you allocate to 1040NR, it will be transferred to 1040, and the end result is the same. For example, suppose the total income is 100, the nonresident portion is 60, resident portion is 40, as they have the same characteristic, you add them together and report 100 on the end of year return form 1040.
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