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Suggested Apple Tax podcasts?

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#1
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probably some, like Spidell's Ca Tax Minute are paid subscriptions.
 

#2
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Ed Zollars has a pretty good podcast "Current Federal Tax Developments". Not sure if it's available on Apple or not. Usually a new one every week.
 

#3
RowTax  
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Ed Zollars Current Federal Tax Developments is on Youtube.....it is very good.....it comes out every Sunday afternoon, so I reserve time to listen to it with headphones...It is pretty in depth, but a great use of time...I now take Chat GPT and import the transcript and have it provide a bullet point summary...That serves as the basis for a Monday in house tax update for my staff. He really covers subjects well...lots of background info.
 

#4
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Podcasts generally have a link to an RSS feed which can be imported into any podcast software. Not all feeds are public, so if Spidell's is paid then you generally wouldn't have access to it.

Another +1 for Ed Zollars' podcast. I don't know if I would trust an AI bot to summarize it, though -- professionals should consider listening to it in general.

A podcast I used to listen to (unfortunately it went inactive, but the archive should still be available) was called ThriveCast which focused more on practice management issues. I have a few episodes saved on my phone that I revisit every so often.
 

#5
Frankly  
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lenraphael wrote:probably some, like Spidell's Ca Tax Minute are paid subscriptions.

You can get this free via e-mail.
 

#6
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RT, a bit more detail on how you're using ChatGPT. I tried it for laughs, and it is serious AI

md, never did understand use of RSS feeds. I thought those were obsolete. What does importing a feed into podcast software do?

All: was hoping that Amazon podcasts included most of the good tax ones, but it doesn't. Added Apple podcasts to Amazon.

btw, if you use Iphone, it's simple to use the apple "shorcut" app to create shortcuts to specific Apple podcasts that Siri will obey as commands.
 

#7
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lenraphael wrote:md, never did understand use of RSS feeds. I thought those were obsolete. What does importing a feed into podcast software do?


RSS feeds are the technology on how podcasts are sent to listeners. A link to a podcast is just a link is just an RSS feed which is updated when new episodes are available.

A podcast player reads the RSS feeds you have subscribed to and learns when new or updated content is available. At that point, it will let you know that the new episode is available and may download the audio file for later playing, or simply facilitate the streaming of the podcast when you tell it to play.
 

#8
RowTax  
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The Chat GPT has been spot on with its summation.. there is a chrome extension for YouTube. YouTube already has a transcript feature, but the chrome extension makes it easy to copy into Chat Gpt .The command I use is…. Summarize the following with 15 bullet points ( paste as plain text here) ..I have just listened to it by now, so I can easily see that it did the summary correctly. Sometimes Zollars is so dense and always over 45 minutes long that I have to break up the transcripts into 2 parts, as the whole transcript seems to hit a unstated word limit.

News reported that a California university professor said chat gpt passed an MBA exam. Microsoft just invested 10 billion.
I have asked it detailed tax questions against known detailed answers, and, so far it’s been correct.
 

#9
RowTax  
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Here is the summary provided by Chat GPT for Current Federal Tax Developments for the Youtube posted on 1/22/23

IRS provides extended due dates for tax relief for victims of storms in Georgia and Alabama.
The relief is similar to the relief provided for California storms earlier.
The relief applies to due dates after January 12th, 2023 and extends them to May 15th, 2023.
This includes tax return filing due dates for physical gear entities and the first estimate for 2022.
The relief applies to individuals who reside in or have their books and records located in the counties listed on the IRS website as disaster areas related to the storms.
The list of affected counties may grow and taxpayers should check if their clients are in close proximity.
Taxpayers do not have to do anything if their address is in the affected counties.
If the address is not in the affected counties, taxpayers may have to contact the IRS.
IRS executive states that the IRS has achieved the goal of responding to practitioner priority line calls on average within 10 minutes.
This is a recent development and it will be interesting to see the impacts going forward.
IRS releases new auto depreciation limits for 2023 under Section 280 cap f and the lease inclusion tables.
Taxpayer loses court case where he tried to exclude a distribution he received from a 401k plan because he had been diagnosed with diabetes two years earlier and lost his job unrelated reasons.
The court ruled that the taxpayer misunderstood the article he read online and the exclusion did not apply in his case.
Overall, IRS is providing tax relief and improving phone response times while also releasing new auto depreciation limits and lease inclusion tables.

Tax Court memo case 2023-9 involves a taxpayer who received a distribution from a 401k plan.
The taxpayer had been diagnosed with diabetes in 2015 and continued to work until losing his job in 2017 unrelated to his diabetes.
The taxpayer took a distribution from the 401K plan due to financial pressure and was hit with a 10% early distribution penalty for the amounts coming out of the account.
The taxpayer read an article on the internet and interpreted it to mean that if he was disabled and that his diabetes qualified as a disability, he didn't have to pay tax on the distribution from the retirement plan.
The court noted that the article was not talking about whether the distribution is taxable, but whether he had to pay the 10% early distribution penalty.
The court also noted that even if the article said it was excludable, the article is not what's binding in the courts, the courts are looking to the underlying law.
Under the underlying law, distributions are taxable and there is no disability exception for the regular income tax.
The court noted that there is a disability exclusion for the 10% early distribution penalty, but the taxpayer has to show that he is disabled.
The Treasury regulations indicate that diabetes is a condition that could qualify for the exception but the court has to look at the specific condition of the taxpayer.
The underlying real test is whether the taxpayer is able to engage in substantial gainful activity, which generally means being able to work and be paid for it.
The court said there was no evidence submitted that the taxpayer could not perform substantial gainful activity and he was not able to qualify for the disability exclusion.
The court ruled that the taxpayer had to include the entire distribution amount in his income and pay the 10% early distribution penalty.
 

#10
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RowTax wrote:News reported that a California university professor said chat gpt passed an MBA exam.


I have a Master's degree in business, and I'll be the first to say that ChatGPT passing a MBA exam is not exactly a high accomplishment :lol:

All joking aside, I am pretty impressed with the output. The bigger issues look to be on the transcription side and the way Ed talks. Thanks for sharing this!
 


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